FOUR MINUTES WITH... STUDIO C

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Who are you and what do you make?

I’m Cath, a maker of tiny pots and wearable pieces of porcelain jewellery. The moment I started working with this beautiful earthy medium I was hooked. After many years creating and experimenting it’s such a privilege to be actually selling now. 
 

What do you enjoy making the most?

I enjoy the wonderful tactile nature of the process. I enjoy taking each piece through the rather slow, methodical processes of shaping, imprinting, sanding, colouring, glazing and firing. Each step is absorbing, calming and sometimes unpredictable though always joyful.

 

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

The Blue Mountains is my birthplace. I grew up here into my teens and, after years working abroad, returned with a family to raise. The Mountains gets into your blood; you can’t beat the bush, the mist, the air and the p(e)ace. It’s a special place.

 

Who’s your maker of the minute?

As a passionate lover and supporter of the handmade this is a hard question to answer. One art form I really admire is screen printing on linens;  I just love the beautiful work of Promenade Design and Laughing Bird Studio.

 

Studio C’s pots and jewellery are available in Atelier of Lyttleton Stores, Laswon.



FOUR MINUTES WITH... GREG CROWE

 photograph by Luisa Brimble

photograph by Luisa Brimble

Who are you and what do you make?

I am Greg Crowe and I recently moved to Sydney from Perth. I have been potting and teaching pottery for over 40 years.

What do you enjoy making the most?

Without a doubt if I could only make one style of pot it would be bowls, simply functional or simply decorative, with a presence of their own.

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

I have always visited the Blue Mountains when in Sydney. I think they are a calm oasis for Sydney with spectacular scenery and an incredible feeling of the unknown.

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

There are many potters that I admire, some I have worked with in the past, such as Svend Bayer, Devon, UK, Jeff Oestreich, Minnesota, US and Gwyn Hanssen Piggot , Australia. Also Micheal Simon, US and Richard Batterham, UK who I have not worked with. My taste is fairly eclectic, but usually around thrown pots.
 

Greg Crowe’s ceramics are available at Lyttleton Stores, Lawson.


 

FOUR MINUTES WITH... PATRICIA SWIFTHUNTER

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Who are you and what do you make?

My name is Trish and I have been making since my mother taught me to knit when I was about 5 years old.  I will try my hand at anything but love sewing clothes and knitting. 

What do you enjoy making the most?

I enjoy making things that use natural fibres or that use upcycled and recycled fabrics.  A number of the children’s clothes that I make are made using fabrics that are no longer wanted by other makers or that started out with a different life. 

The produce bags that are currently for sale at Atelier are made using bolt end fabric.  This stops a little going into land fill and by using them we all help to keep some plastic out of use.  I am currently working on some shopping bags and other household bits that would also lessen our impact on the environment.   

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

We only moved to the Blue Mountains in January 2017 but it feels like being home after many years of moving around!  It did from the moment we arrived at the front gate on our first viewing of the house. I believe that I live in the most beautiful place on earth with views that are sublime.  And now I am building the garden that I have always wanted.

Living here has opened a new palette for my work and the mists in particular inspire me.

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

I am in awe of Katwise!  Or Kat O’Sullivan, who upcycles woollen op shop finds into the most amazing sweaters and coats.  Her approach to her making and life is just a joyous journey. 

 

Patricia SwiftHunter's produce bags are available at Lyttleton Stores, Lawson and Trish’s knitwear was also available at our Wintertide Makers Market on the 22nd of July.


 

FOUR MINUTES WITH... WYCK

 photograph by Luisa Brimble

photograph by Luisa Brimble

Who are you and what do you make?

Ian: We are Ian and Robyn, friends who work together to make WYCK candles. We hand make everything. We blend the oils, and hand pour, wick and label each candle; we even individually fold each votive box. 
 

What do you enjoy making the most?

Ian: I've got a logical, analytical sort of mind, which is important when the process of making candles requires (at times) adherence to process.  But it also allows imagination - in creating the fragrances, in selecting papers, in making boxes. Every time I finish a candle or a box of votives, I still look at it and think "that's beautiful, and I made it".  It's also nice after spending a day pouring to have people tell me how pretty I smell!

Robyn: To me, there are three parts that give me the most joy. The first is taking a candle out of its mould, smelling the scent as it is first released and seeing how the texture in the wax has appeared on each candle differently. The second is the creative side of playing with scent combinations – how much of this against how much of that – until you have the balance just right. The third is when we have direct contact with a customer who has enjoyed a Wyck candle – it makes my heart smile to know that people are enjoying our creations.

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

Ian: The Blue Mountains is something of a sanctuary.  If I'm ever away, even just down in Sydney for the day, there's a sense of calm and relief when I return.  It's both the feeling of community and the sheer beauty that surrounds us.  It's home - and I consider myself lucky every single day.

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

Ian: That's a really difficult question - the diversity of the creativity makes it really hard to single out just one maker.  If I were to pick one, it would probably be Steve Sheridan and the delicacy of the beauty found in his ceramics. 

Robyn:  For me, the answer is Freedom Wilson of Laughing Bird. Her artistic style is beautiful and speaks of the Blue Mountains and Australia. I love her Lyrebird; always have, always will.

 

Wyck's Australian bush-scented 50 hour and 75 hour pillar candles and sets of four votive candles are available in Atelier of Lyttleton Stores, Lawson.

 

FOUR MINUTES WITH... WILD BOTANIK

 photograph courtesy of Ona Janzen

photograph courtesy of Ona Janzen

Who are you and what do you make?

I am Tania Bowers. I make textiles and objects based on botanicals I grow or forage and collect.

I also keep vintage objects to include in my accessories and artworks.

 

What do you enjoy making the most?

It changes constantly. I'm not much of a production-line person. Some weeks I'm all about eco-dyeing textiles, the next I'm back to leather work or hand stitching. 

I guess the answer is change; I enjoy making change the most!

 

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

The Blue Mountains means home and where a new chapter of my life began. It means fresh air and more freedom, more space and peace than I've ever had before. 

 

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

I've been looking at quilts again, so definitely the Women of Gee's bend. Communities that make together are my biggest inspiration right  now. 

 

Wild Botanik's eco-dyed ribbon, scarves and cushions are available in Atelier of Lyttleton Stores, Lawson.

 

 

FOUR MINUTES WITH... ROB BAIGENT

 photograph by Luisa Brimble

photograph by Luisa Brimble

Who are you and what do you make?

My name is Rob Baigent. I have lived in the mountains for 10 years, but have had some association with the area for more than 40. Whilst growing up in Tasmania I developed an appreciation of the beauty and joys of timbers such as Blackwood, Huon pine, Sassafras, and Celerytop pine. Most of my work is turned wood, particularly smaller items which can be salvaged from discarded or ‘waste’ material. I also make small items of furniture. My wood turning started about 30 years ago, but I have been doing other woodwork most of my life.

 

What do you enjoy making the most?

The more intricate things like turned boxes are my favourites, particularly when combined with some embellishment like carved handles or a little added colour. My greatest pleasure comes from finding the beauty in a discarded piece of timber.

 

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

The Blue Mountains World Heritage Area is a magnificent example of why it is essential to preserve as much of our natural environment as possible – it is such a beautiful and interesting place to live and walk. The wonderful natural environment obviously attracts many very talented people. This combination of environment and talented people makes it really special.

 

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

This is difficult; there are so many amazing people working with wood in Australia. At the moment I will nominate Neil Turner in West Australia as my favourite. His beautiful, intricate carving of turned objects is inspiring. 

 

Rob Baigent’s wood-turned bowls, vases and ornaments are exclusively available in Atelier of Lyttleton Stores, Lawson.

 

 

FOUR MINUTES WITH… MIRANDA EARLE

 photograph by Luisa Brimble

photograph by Luisa Brimble

Who are you and what do you make?

My name's Miranda Earle. I love pattern and colour and I’ve been printing my designs onto fabric for many enjoyable years. I'm inspired by the form and geometry of nature. I love the process of carving my own lino blocks and the repetition of printing lengths of fabric. My designs and hand printed fabrics can be found on handmade purses, scarves as clothing. 

 

What do you enjoy making the most?

It's all about the fabric. I like transforming my sketches into designs that work on blocks and stencils. The process itself is so enjoyable and exciting. I never get tired of it.

 

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?
The Blue Mountains represent not only an incredible community of talented and innovative creatives, but also the endless inspiration that I find in nature. We are so privileged to have it on our doorstep here!

 

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

It’s so hard to choose just one! I'm so privileged to be surrounded by so many wonderful makers and creatives. I'm going to say the label High Tea With Mrs Woo. 

 

Miranda Earle’s firewheel tree, flannel flower and wattle purses are exclusively available in Atelier of Lyttleton Stores, Lawson.

 

 

FOUR MINUTES WITH… EDITH REWA  

 photograph by Nick McKinlay

photograph by Nick McKinlay

Who are you and what do you make?

I am Edith Rewa, or Edie! I trained in textile design (screen printing) but I mostly make pennies from plant-based illustrative work now. I design illustrated silk headscarves, which showcase Australia's native flora and fauna. I also have a range of art prints, gift cards and a small run of clothing in the works. When I'm not working on my product range I'm doing client-based illustration and pattern work.

 

What do you enjoy making the most?

Nothing beats sitting out on the heathland behind where I live, looking out over the Kanimbla Valley, tucked in between leptospermum, casuarina, mallee and banksias with styphelia nipping at my ankles. It’s these sorts of immersive hours spent drawing in the bush that give me the most joy. I recently had a small exhibition, 'Plant Portraits, Blackheath' which was a culmination of time spent in the Blackheath landscape doing just this!

 

What do the Blue Mountains mean to you?

For me the Mountains have been a place of great learning, where I have had space to stretch my legs and have a wonderfully indulgent work life!

 

Who’s you’re maker of the minute?

 Mirador!

 

Edith Rewa’s scarves and cards are available in Atelier of Lyttleton Stores, Lawson.